On Homemade Soup Day: cream of roasted garlic & onion soup

BY: CHEF JANET CRAIG

It’s Homemade Soup Day! And Janet Craig has a great, hearty homemade soup for you – enjoy!

  • Ten whole cloves or two whole heads, cleaned
  • Four cleaned, washed leeks, chopped
  • Three yellow or white onions, peeled and chopped
  • Two large white potatoes peeled and cubed
  • One tetra pack of good quality chicken broth
  • ¼ cup butter
  • Two cups Vermouth
  • One cup milk
  • One cup whipping cream
  • Fresh parsley, chives to garnish

3 images: Cream of Roasted Garlic and Onion Soup, bottom left,garilc, bottom right, red onions

  1. Place all cleaned vegetables into buttered roasting pan.
  2. Cover with broth and wine. Roast 1 hour at 350 F.
  3. Put cooled vegetables and remaining fluid into a food processor and pulse until rough chunks.
  4. Add cream and pulse more. Taste and season with white pepper and salt then add milk to thin, if needed. Garnish with fresh herbs
  5. Serve hot with a dollop of cheese, either Asiago or Stilton, in the bowl.

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Chef Janet Craig recipes are simple, healthy, delicious and ABI friendly.  You can find out more about her HERE.

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Baked Cocoa Wings

BY: JANET CRAIG

Just on time for Super Bowl Weekend – or if that isn’t your thing – a Valentine’s / Anti-Valentine’s feast – our favourite chef Janet Craig brings you Baked Cocoa Wings!

This is a ‘rub’ that could be used on chicken wings or drumettes. The recipe could be doubled or tripled and stored in a glass jar for future meals, it’s also great on ribs so go ahead and enjoy!

Plate of chicken wings

  • Three tablespoons chili powder
  • One tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • Two tablespoons flour – this can be gluten free or cornmeal. The fat in the skin of the wings will make them crispy.
  • One tablespoon garlic powder
  • One teaspoon cinnamon
  • Two teaspoons cumin powder
  • One teaspoon salt and pepper
  • 1teaspoon cayenne (optional)
  • 13 lb chicken wings per person (appetizer portion)

1. Mix all the rub ingredients together and dust the wings well.

2. Cut off the wing tips, reserving them for another use such as
stock if desired, and halve the wings at the joint. Pat the
wings dry, season them with the rub mix .

3. If using the oven, place on the parchment lined cooking
sheet, under a preheated broiler about four inches from the
heat for ten minutes. Turn the wings and broil them for ten
minute more, or until they look crisp.

Lime Mayo Dip
One cup mayonnaise
Juice and zest from one lime
One clove of garlic minced
Two tablespoons fresh cilantro chopped
½ small seeded jalapeño-finely chopped (optional)


Chef Janet Craig’s recipes are simple, healthy, delicious and ABI friendly.  You can find out more about her HERE.
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How being buried in an avalanche led to yoga teacher training: Michael Levine

BY: MERI PERRA

Tuesday, March 19, 2013, an adventurous ski getaway in Whistler, B.C. changed the course of Michael Levine’s life forever. A Class 2 avalanche struck while Levine, along with his brother and a friend, were hiking up the back side of the mountain in the backcountry of Whistler Blackcomb. Levine’s friend and brother escaped relatively unscathed, Levine at first did not.

“I was fully buried under four feet of snow,” Levine said.

Beginning the search, both his brother and friend were miraculously able to locate him and first discovered his snowboard boot, Levine’s brother and friend were quick to react and shoveled him out, to find him unconscious and non-breathing.

“They went to clear my airway and found my mouth was full of snow,” Levine said. “They [shook me] and moments later, I began breathing on my own.”

The Whistler Avalanche search and rescue Team helicoptered into the area to rescue Levine, his brother and friend. They were then transported to the Whistler Health Care Centre, where the life-saving rescue made the news.

Diagnosed with a concussion at first, Levine took a flight back to Toronto a mere two days after the accident. He showed up for work that week, as a financial adviser at a downtown Bay Street firm, where his Branch Manager immediately recognized something wasn’t right with his health.

“My eyes were completely blood shot, I had headaches and sensitivity to screens, light and noise,” Levine said.

So began Levine’s journey to recovery. In fairness, Levine says, not many health practitioners treat avalanche survivors in Ontario, and many did not know what to do. He was determined, trying to find the right care until he started treatment at the David L. MacIntosh Sport Medicine Clinic at the University of Toronto. It was at the MacIntosh Clinic where Levine learned he had sustained an anoxic brain injury due to lack of oxygen to the brain, in addition, to his concussion.

“The recovery was extremely challenging for the first two years,” Levine, who says he has not taken any prescription medication or over-the-counter pain medicine since his injury. “I was advised by my doctors to take a leave of absence from work which started out as three months, then turned into six months, and then it ended up being a year and a half.”

Skiing in the backcountry is at your own risk and adventure seeking skiiers are strongly suggested to proceed with caution. Levine, his brother and friend were experienced and equipped adventurers prepared for the day.

Whistler, appeared safe and enticing despite having variable weather patterns that week, and Levine was capable and adaptable to the conditions when the event occurred. Doctors said his health beforehand helped him survive and recover, initially, as well as he did.

Levine had no choice but to adapt to this new way of life. His exercise routine had to change. Elevating his heart rate put too much pressure on his brain. Socializing and working became a much slower pace than he was used to. He limited his workout routine to gentle yoga and the stationary bike. He had to give up weight lifting for over a year. He dealt with short term memory loss, fatigue, lack of energy and continued to experience sensitivity to light and noise.

Levine says the multidisciplinary team at the Toronto Rehabilitation Clinic, where treatment included occupational, physical and speech therapy moved him to the next level of his recovery. Cranial Sacral Therapy, Levine says, got him even closer to the final recovery stage and it became a significant part of his ongoing support to improve his health.

“I knew what I was capable of before the accident,” Levine said. “Now I had to learn to adapt to this new way of life. I had to really listen to my body and if I really don’t have any energy I had to say no to people or events. It was a learning experience.”

Levine says it wasn’t ‘just one thing’ that helped with his recovery. Talk therapy was also an important component to my recovery during the second phase. Not to leave out the fact that food is medicine for Levine and he focused on nutrition and supplements.

Levine says recovery from a brain injury also became a chance to find his true purpose and reevaluate what is important in his life. He took a detour from the financial world for two years and worked as a stylist in the menswear industry. This allowed him time and space to reflect, heal, reorganize and prioritize.

Today Levine is back in the finance office, working full time developing a business with a team. He is mindful of his time management balancing work, social, rest, exercise, and achieving optimal health and well being in today’s fast pace environment. And congratulations to Levine he has just completed the 200 hour yoga teacher training at YogaSpace.

“Yoga has been a part of my life for the last seven years,” Levine said. “It’s a great way for me to give back, and share with others in the community.”

You can catch Levine’s community class at YogaSpace this Sunday, January 28 and on Sunday March 11 at 8:45 a.m. on both days. He’ll also teach at the Attic at Lululemon (318 Queen West) on March 17 at 3 p.m. The cost is $5, and all levels are welcome, Levine says he teaches a strengthening flow class, which is open to beginners and more experienced.

We have a hunch a lot more is coming for this ABI thriver, especially for you yogis out here.

“I’d love to customize a [yoga] sequence for ABI survivors,” Levine said.

Sounds  nama-awesome. 

Yoga Space

148 Ossington Avenue |Toronto, Ontario, Canada | M6J 2Z5


Meri Perra is the Communications Coordinator at BIST. 

Easy Vietnamese Pho Soup

BY: JANET CRAIG

Soup makes winter better, which is one reason why January is Soup Month.

To help you partake, our favourite Chef Janet Craig has created this easy Pho Soup recipe. Give it a try, and cook up some deliciousness, health and warmth this chilly season. Here’s to soup!

  • One tetra pack of Pho broth
  • Four ounce rice noodles
  • One, four-ounce piece of beef steak, (round, top sirloin), slightly frozen
  • Two cups of  bean sprouts
  • Shredded carrot or red peppers
  • Green onions, sliced lime, basil, mint, and /or cilantro to garnish

3 pictures: top - pho soup, bottom left: Campbell's Pho Broth, bottom right close up of cut up vegetable for Pho Soup

1. Bring the Pho broth to the boil. If you wish to add more seasonings like fish sauce, ginger, or garlic, this is the time.
2. Cover the rice noodles with boiling water & let sit for 10 minutes.
3. Take the steak & slice it very thin. This is why you put it in the freezer for a bit.
4. Place the steak, noodles, and vegetables into large bowl.
5. Pour on the very hot broth. Meat will turn opaque.
6. Soup is usually served with hot Chili/garlic sauce .

PHOTO: JANET CRAIG


Chef Janet Craig’s recipes are simple, healthy, delicious and ABI friendly. You can find out more about her HERE.

 

The Ultimate Guide to board games for brain training

Woman plays Jenga game

BY: ALISON

Without lights and sounds associating with gaming apps or consoles, board games are less stimulating than other activities and require very little physical exertion. They were among very few things that I was able to do during the acute phase of my injury.

Board games are great for brain training and reconditioning. In fact, I suggested board games as a mentally challenging activity in my previous article, Having a brain injury increases your chances of dementia: here are activities that can help and are great for encouraging and facilitating social interaction.

After my injury, I wanted to avoid my friends, because conversations were exhausting and difficult to follow. But playing board games with friends was perfect. I got the social connection that I needed without having to engage in deep conversation. Also, the pressure and focus was off of me, since everyone’s attention was directed towards the game.

Not to mention, board games are super fun (heck, they’ve withstood the test of time), provide hours of distraction, and can be played solo. I didn’t need assistance or company for entertainment.

The selection of board games is endless, so there’s always something new to try.

Scrabble board
Photo: Pixabay via  Pexels

 

How to challenge yourself using board games:

The following guidelines will teach you how to train your brain by gradually increasing the difficulty of your board games. The steps should be tackled one at a time, moving forward only when you are confident with the previous step. Be patient with yourself, as you may need weeks or months before advancing. Regular practice and repetition are the keys to success here.

Step 1:

In the beginning, focus only on learning and following the rules of the game. Don’t worry about speed or trying to win. Simply learn the basics of how to play. Play as many times as needed to become familiar with it. This will improve your learning and memory skills.

Step 2:

If you’re playing a game by yourself, then play with the goal of improving your result, speed, or efficiency. For example, depending on the game, you could try to collect more points, finish the game more quickly, or finish the game using fewer moves. Work through one objective at a time.

If you’re playing a game with others, figure out one strategy that will help you win the game. However, the focus should be on discovering and practicing the strategy, not on winning. This promotes problem-solving skills. If you’re stuck, ask the person you’re playing with to teach you their approach. Once you’re familiar with the first one, see if there are other strategies that could help you win the game. Determine which one(s) are the most effective. Eventually, the goal is to use a combination of strategies at the same time. This is great practice for multi-tasking skills. You might even start winning more games.

Step 3:

Now that you’ve figured out how you like to play the game, it’s time to pay attention to how your opponents are playing. See if they make decisions differently from you, figure out what their strategies are, and try to predict their next moves. Compare their approach to your own, see which one is more effective, and learn from them. Furthermore, think of new tactics that will prevent your opponents from winning. This will exercise your analytical and critical-thinking skills.

Finally, try to improve your chances of winning. You will likely need to change your plan multiple times throughout a game in order to adapt to new scenarios/problems and to circumvent your opponents. Once you become really good at the game, start these steps over again with a different game.

board games that can be adapted for single players

Board games that can be adapted for single players:

While it’s better to play board games with other people, one-player games allow you to practice at any time. Some of the board games listed were not originally designed for single players, but you will find solo variant instructions online. The following suggestions vary widely in difficulty and cost.

Word Games

Scattergories

Bananagrams

Scrabble

Boggle

Honourable mention: Code Names – Although this game cannot be played solo, it is, in my opinion, the best word-focused, brain training game. It allows you to practice communication, word associations, and different thought processes. The cards could even be used separately for reading and comprehension.

Pattern Games

  1. Set – This simple card game is really good for unique pattern-recognition, concentration, and different lines of thinking.
  2. Bingo –  even more fun if there are small prizes to be won.
  3. Puzzles
  4. Carcassonne – No language skills are required to play this tile-based puzzle / strategic game.
  5. Enigma – Includes fragment puzzles and 3-D puzzles among other challenges.

Honourable mention: Sudoku – This is not a board game, but it’s great for figuring out number patterns. The difficulty ranges from easy to very hard. Also, you can find free printable sudokus online.

 Fine Motor Skills Games

  1. Jenga – Try Giant Jenga if fine motor skills are an issue.)
  2. Perfection – There’s the original version with 25 pieces and a more affordable version with only 9 pieces. This game also has a pattern-matching/puzzle component to it.
Woman plays Jenga game
Photo: Pixabay 

Honourable mention: Building blocks and sets (e.g wooden blocks, jumbo cardboard blocks, Mega Bloks, Lego, K’Nex, etc.) – These aren’t board games, but they’re great for stimulating creativity.

Memory Games

  1. There are many different versions of matching card games that were designed to practice memory skills. See here for more information, you could also play this type of memory game using a regular deck of cards.

General Knowledge Games

  1. Cardline – Variations include: Globetrotter, Animals, Dinosaurs
  2. Timeline  – Variations include: Diversity, Historical Event, Inventions, Music and Cinema, Science and Discoveries

Problem Solving or Brain Teaser Games

  1. Mindtrap  – A game with many riddles, brain teasers, and picture puzzles.

  2. Enigma – This includes math-based and various puzzle-based challenges.

  3. Robot Turtles – This is a kids game that can be used to practice logical thinking, planning ahead, and improving efficiency. It was originally designed to introduce programming fundamentals to kids.)

Strategy Games

  1. Single-player card games, such as Solitaire (played with a regular deck of cards, Instructions on how to play can be found here) or Friday – a survival / battling card game.
  2. Catan Dice Game – a settlement-building game was designed for one or more players.
  3. Pandemic – The object of this game is to treat and eradicate diseases before they spread out of control.
  4. Imperial Settlers – This empire-building game was designed for 1 or more players.
  5. Blokus – This tile-placement game does not require language skills.

Adventure Games

  1. Mage Knight – This is the most complex and expensive board game I’ve listed in this article. It is a strategic game that is based in an adventure and story. The game includes instructions for solo play, but there are many pieces and rules, so I suggest watching YouTube videos, HERE and HERE that help explain them.

My Favourite Games Stores:

  1. Walmart

Walmart doesn’t have a large selection of unique games, but every now and then they have great sales on classic games. I purchased the following games for less than $20 each while they were on sale: Scattegories, Bingo, puzzles, Jenga, Perfection, Sudoku books, and decks of playing cards.

  1. 401 Games

This is my favourite board games store. They have an extensive selection, competitive prices, and incredibly knowledgeable staff. They have a storefront at 518 Yonge Street, Toronto, and an online store as well.

Although their store is wheelchair accessible, their games room for events is not. If you want to avoid a crowd, go before 3 pm or shop online. I suggest ordering your games online and then picking them up at the store to save on shipping. If transportation is an issue, shipping is a flat rate of $8.95 per order. Shipping is free for orders of $150 or more.


Mind Yourself with Alison’ is a collection of self-help tips, research, and personal experiences dedicated to helping people thrive after brain injury (or other trauma). Check out Alison’s other BIST Blog articles Women and Brain Injury: What you need to know and How to be a Good Friend to a Survivor.

Is the ketogenic diet the future for TBI treatment?

BY: MELINDA EVANS

Ask any dietitian, and they’ll probably tell you that their clients are asking them about the ketogenic diet more than any other recent ‘fad’ diet. Popular headlines have proclaimed it the miracle diet to shed weight, boost energy, reverse diabetes and send cancer into remission.

But does this diet live up to its hype? What could it possibly have to do with recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI)? And more importantly, is it safe?

The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet started out as anything but a fad. It was developed almost 100 years ago to treat children with epilepsy that didn’t respond to anti-epileptic medications. By definition, it is a very low carbohydrate (less than five per cent of total energy per day), high fat (about 80 per cent of energy) and moderate protein (15 – 20 per cent) diet.

This is vastly different from Health Canada’s recommended macronutrient distribution, which is 45 – 65 per cent carbohydrate, 10 – 35 per cent protein and 20 – 35 per cent fat. Since glucose (a carbohydrate) is our body’s preferred source of fuel, this high fat / low carbohydrate diet essentially tricks the body into believing it is in a state of starvation. The liver begins to convert fat into ketones (hence the name), and the brain’s cells are forced to adapt. The result, for someone with intractable epilepsy, can be a 50 to 90 per cent decline in seizures.

Once medical practitioners observed the effectiveness of ketosis for the treatment of epileptic seizures, they started to wonder whether it might help other neurological injuries and neurodegenerative disorders, including hypoxia, ischemic stroke, ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and of course, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Benefits of Ketosis for Traumatic Brain Injury

For a multitude of ethical and practical reasons, it is next to impossible to perform randomized clinical trials on humans with TBIs, so the research we have that looks at the role of the ketogenic diet has been done in animals. The findings are promising though, and suggest that following injury, when the brain’s need for energy is high but its ability to metabolize glucose is impaired, ketones might provide an alternative and efficient source of energy.

Following trauma, brain cells are at increased risk of oxidation, cell death and DNA damage, and the presence of ketones and absence of glucose may reduce oxygen available for oxidation and guard cells against free radicals and DNA damage, while increasing cerebral blood flow.

Knowledge Gaps

This is an exciting prospect, but we still need a lot of answers before we can incorporate it into practice. We don’t know which type or severity of brain injury might respond well to ketosis, or whether it is best achieved through fasting, the ketogenic diet or even intravenous provision of ketones. It is unclear whether ketosis is helpful only initially after injury, or if it will support brain recovery if used for a longer period of time. It’s possible that a modified and less restrictive form of the ketogenic diet would work just as well as the standard diet, and some studies suggest that it might be even more effective when supplemented with certain nutrients, including medium chain triglycerides and branched chain amino acids.

Challenges of the Ketogenic Diet

There are several challenges with the ketogenic diet, the first being compliance. Since it is extremely restrictive, it is difficult for most people to stick to the diet long-term. It excludes entire food groups (grains, fruits and many vegetables), increasing the risk of nutrient deficiencies including sodium, potassium, chloride, vitamin D, calcium, magnesium, selenium and zinc. Among other issues, these deficiencies can impair bone healing and increase the risk of osteopenia and bone fractures. For people with pre-existing kidney disease or renal failure associated with trauma, the high protein intake that usually accompanies a high fat diet may not be appropriate. And of course, with a high fat diet there is concern about elevated cholesterol levels. Studies evaluating the use of the ketogenic diet in children found elevated triglyceride, and total, HDL and LDL cholesterol levels at 6 months and 10 years, making this diet risky for people predisposed to coronary artery disease. Long-term use has also been associated with growth retardation in children, low-grade acidosis, constipation, dehydration,  vomiting and nausea.

A grilled cheese sandwich made with cauliflower
Photo of a Cauliflower Crusted Grill Cheese Sandwich via KirbieCravings.com

The Future of Ketosis in Brain Recovery

So, is the ketogenic diet the future for TBI treatment? Will it minimize brain injury and help to rehabilitate cognitive function, memory and recall? Maybe. We don’t have enough information yet to make it standard practice, and it certainly should never be implemented without careful monitoring from a physician and dietitian.

More research in humans is needed before we can give a final verdict, but what we know so far about ketosis and the brain is promising!


Melinda Edmonds is a Registered Dietitian with Aimee Hayes & Associates. She is a registered member in good standing with the College of Dietitians of Ontario and an active member of Dietitians of Canada. The focus of her practice is on the application of evidence-based nutrition therapies to optimize clients’ health, nutritional status and well-being in order to augment their quality of life and rehabilitation outcomes.

Aimee Hayes and Associates provides nutrition rehabilitation services to individuals with acquired and traumatic brain, spinal cord, and orthopedic injuries. Our diverse and dynamic team of Registered Dietitians works collaboratively with clients, families, caregivers and interdisciplinary rehabilitation teams to optimize nutrition in order to promote our clients’ wellness and recovery.

My traumatic brain injury: Sister caregiver experience.

BY: SAMIRA OMAR

I remember the last thing we did as a family. A week before everything happened we celebrated Eid Al-Fitr.

For those of you who are not aware, Eid is a Muslim festival that happens twice a year where we get together with family and friends, and share a big meal. Both Eids have distinct connotations. In particular, Eid Al-Fitr represents the celebration of 30-days of fasting known as the month of Ramadan. Eid is one of the happiest days of the year and to top it off, that Eid occurred on a hot summer day.

Close up of a plate of food served at Eid
A dish served at Eid Al-Fitr, Photo courtesy of Samira Omar

My family has nine children, and a total of 11 people, so traveling together is always challenging. That day, for the first time in a while, we all went out together. It was an amazing experience, one that we spoke of for days after.

I’ll never forget the way I felt when I first heard the news about my brother. I can vividly recall it as if it were yesterday. The same couple of moments and memories consistently flood my mind, and even though it has been over three years since it happened, I think about it every single day because it completely affected and changed all aspects of my life.

I can remember seeing him leave the house, and every time I closed my eyes I saw my brother’s face at the forefront of my mind. I can speak for everyone in my family when I say that my brother’s traumatic brain injury changed our lives because it affected every aspect of our daily living. Having said that, I always felt like it affected me the most.

Because of who I am as a person, and the role I play in my family dynamics, I spent every day at the hospital for two and a half years while my brother received care. I saw things I can never un-see. My time at the hospital changed every aspect of my life, and how I perceive the world.

3 empty hospital beds
PHOTO: 1662222 via Pixabay.com

With so many siblings in my family, naturally, some of us are closer than others. My brother and I were, and are, very close. We told each other everything, and we always trusted one another. All of that factored into how much it really impacted my life, emotions, and day-to day-thinking.

Imagine one day you woke up in a hospital bed not able to do many or most of things that you were once able to do. How would you feel? Now imagine knowing that what happened to you was the result of a violent assault. These thoughts never left my head and I would constantly put myself in his shoes and think, “How would I feel if this were me?”

The doctors said my brother had an extremely poor outlook, and a slim to none chance of a meaningful recovery. These were the exact words that were used. It seemed as though everyone was treating him like he would not have a future, I never took that to heart. I could not give up hope.

There was and is still not a lot known about the brain. During this time, nothing else mattered but making sure my brother was doing well and being looked after. I did not feel comfortable leaving him in the hands of strangers, especially considering they did not believe he would get better or have a ‘meaningful recovery’.

A picture of a purple flower coming up through the snow,

I went on the Internet every day and looked for more information on traumatic brain injury. I read stories that people have shared based on their experiences. At the time, I felt like I was the only one who believed and had hope my brother would get better. It was the hardest situation that I have ever faced in my life as every day was a constant battle in making sure that his voice was heard, and he received the best care possible.

As the eldest daughter of nine children, and the daughter of immigrant parents, I felt as though it was my responsibility to always look out for the family by using my voice and knowledge to help them make decisions.

Everyone always came to me for support and advice. Yet, in this situation I did not know what to do. It felt like life was moving 200km/hour, ­much faster than I can actually process what was going on.

I was just trying to get through each day not knowing what would happen the next second, minute, or hour. Comforting everybody else was my way of coping because it was one thing to see a sister or brother cry but to witness my parents falling apart only meant what was happening was actually real, and I needed something to hold on to. Positive thinking, and remaining optimistic was the only way I would have been able to get through it all without losing my mind.

I often felt like I was alone but I always remained optimistic. I wanted to give my brother every chance to come back to who he was, and if I did not believe that it could be possible, I felt like I was robbing him of his potential to successfully recover.

A picture of bullrushes covered with snow

Consequently, I would spend 18 hours a day in the hospital, every single day for the past two and a half years that he was hospitalized. It never occurred to me how much time I spent being in a hospital.

I never once thought about myself as a I sought comfort from knowing what was going on in each step of his care. Without giving it any thought, I made the decision to never leave his side and put everything else in my life on hold. I felt guilty if I was doing something that made me happy but did not involve him. I couldn’t think about myself knowing my brother’s suffering.

At the time when this happened I was an undergraduate student. During my free time I used to volunteer at hospitals, engage in various extracurricular activities, and enjoy time with family. Since this happened I felt like I lost all motivation to continue living my “normal” life as nothing about it was normal anymore.

I put the word normal in quotation marks because it is a subjective term. It was extremely difficult to see someone I knew all my life suddenly go through all these struggles, challenges, and difficulties in everyday activities that as able-bodied humans we took for granted.

Furthermore, I found it particularly difficult to balance out what was important to me as I constantly thought of his well-being and would spend most of my hours at the hospital. My rationale for why I was happy to take on such a role was that I wanted everyone in my family to feel content, and not be overwhelmed with what was going on.

Most importantly, I did not want to see everyone miss out on life, friends, and the things that they use they use to do on a regular basis. It was easier for myself to take on this role and still be in high spirits with missing out on the daily things that I used to do, however, the rest of my siblings were just kids, and I did not want to rob them of their childhood. It seemed as though everyone was able to get back into their daily routines and still do what it was that was important to them such as school, and work but I just could not move past this part of my life.

As a caregiver, it is easy to forget about yourself as you are constantly caring for another individual day in and day out. I tended to bury my emotions and how I really felt from others. I never spoke to anyone about how I felt because I did not want to consciously think about it. Everything seemed surreal, and I could not come to terms or accept the situation.

It is through this experience that i have found something that I am immensely passionate about, improving and enhancing the lives of TBI survivors, and their caregivers

Whenever I thought of the circumstances, I felt lost, out of place, and that nobody knew how I was feeling or what I was going through as most of the time I would be alone at the hospital. Nothing in life prepares you for this nor do I think there is a manual out there that explains how to feel, what to do, and to how to cope when situations like this happen. Even if information like that exists, I strongly believe that every situation is unique in its own respects and that there are many other variables to factor into the equation.

“So the hospital phase is over, isn’t that awesome, now you can finally get back to your normal life!” This is what most people said, and the reality is that after you leave the four walls of the hospital, another chapter of the rehabilitation journey begins. It is a whole new world when you have been away from your ‘normal’ one for such a long time, and many people are not aware, or understand what that means. What happens next? What is life going to look like in the next five years, or even two? Nothing is certain, and every day should just be taken as it comes. Recovery is a lifelong process, no matter what the gains.

Fast forward to over three years since it happened, and about 11 months after leaving the hospital, I can say my brother is doing very well and is much happier to be home. He looks very healthy, much like his old self.  I am dealing with the challenges of returning to my old, previously ‘normal’ life, which doesn’t seem normal anymore.

Motivated to return to the life he once had, my brother never gives up. He works hard every day, challenges himself to new lengths, in therapy sessions with his occupational therapist, and physiotherapist, and in everyday tasks.

He once said, “What is it that I will do for the rest of my life? I want to do this, be this, and go here. There is nothing that I cannot do if I work hard. Yes, I had a TBI, but that does not define me, it is just a part of me. I’m still the same person, do not treat me any different.”

I am an avid believer of this quote from Indian author Ritu Ghatourey:

Everything happens for a reason. That reason causes change. Sometimes the change hurts. Sometimes the change is hard. But in the end its all for the best.

I want to take this moment to say that given how horrible and scary this situation was, I am deeply grateful for all that I have witnessed, and learned over the past three years. If it was not for this situation, I would not have known how little people know and understand about the nature of TBIs, the various stigmas and assumptions that society fosters, and how this shapes and influences the ability to successfully reintegrate back into the community, and work as rehabilitation is a lifelong process.

The lack of understanding and awareness in society is a major barrier to successful reintegration, and is a public health concern, considering that TBI will be one of the major leading causes of death and disability by the year 2020.

I made meaning of this situation by believing that for me what had happened was a turning point to help me realize where my passions lie, and what it is that I want to commit to for the rest of my life.

Before this happened, I learned about TBI in my studies but I never once imagined what it would look like first hand. I never understood what it meant to be able-bodied, and to be able to do day-to-day things that we normally do not think of and have taken for granted. Furthermore, I never realized how difficult it was for someone to get around if they were on a wheelchair, and this includes going to the grocery store, the park, or even the bank.

It is through this experience that I have found something that I am immensely passionate about, and it is improving and enhancing the lives of TBI survivors, and their caregivers.


Samira is an MSc Candidate at the University of Western Ontario, in the Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Program, specializing in Health Promotion. Her current research focuses on oral health in traumatic brain injury, where she is qualitatively exploring the lived experiences of health professional students in various rehabilitative programs such as occupational therapy, physiotherapy, speech-language pathology, and nursing.