How we went on a real family vacation after my son’s brain injury

BY: BARB KUSTEC

This is us last summer, when our family decided to drive to Canada’s East Coast provinces and take a real family vacation.

vacation
Our vacation began when headed out late one afternoon in our rented, and very comfortable, RV. Leaving late was our first mistake. Our plan was to get to the Maritimes fast (we wanted to get through Quebec before stopping for the night). That was our second mistake. Then we realized we had forgotten the sleeping pills and other brain injury-related medicine for my son at home. That was our third mistake – a big one.

We learned that to survive on our vacation, we must be better organized. We had to call ahead for hotels, and eat before hitting the road. We needed to get into the habit of allowing for extra time, for everything and anything that could come up. Getting up in the mornings takes longer for the person with the ABI, and changes in environment and routine are harder for them to deal with. Once we slowed down and got organized, the trip went much better.

vacation
As soon as we reached the East Coast, it was smooth sailing. The slower, calmer pace was perfect for our family. The landscape is beautiful, and our family relaxed and began to have a great time together.

We went whale watching, swimming, walked on the ocean floor, did Peggy’s Cove and visited Anne of Green Gables. We took lots of pictures, and it was amazing to see our son take everything in. It was wonderful to see all of us, my husband and two daugthers, relax.

I totally recommend vacation for families who are living with brain injury – especially ones where you’re trapped together in a comfortable RV. The bonding and closeness are moments that will last a lifetime. There were periods of chaos, do not get me wrong, but even those add to the story of us. (And, after the fact, they are funny to remember – like when my husband didn’t take the time to learn where the gas tank was, and had to figure it out when the RV was almost running on empty. After about an hour, the gas tank was found by a carload of young men who Googled it, and it turns out it was inside the driver’s door. My prayers were answered once again!)

vacation
Did the brain injury change our vacation? Absolutely. However, the rewards were greater than the challenges. Thank God we still have our son and brother. Who could ask for more than that?

Barb Kustec is the mother of three – Christopher, age 23; Cassandra, age 15 and Samantha, age 12. She is married to her husband, Danny. This is her second article for Brain Injury Blog TO.

Advertisements