Interactions after a TBI

BY: SABA RIZVI

I think the hardest thing since acquiring my brain injury has been the inability to perform basic functions, such as reading, talking, walking, and just even being able to eat.

photo credit: Girl in Despair via photopin (license)
photo credit: Girl in Despair via photopin (license)

Even now, several years later, these functions still feel like a luxury.

Living with brain injury is usually an invisible disability. People may tell you to ‘try harder’, ‘not be lazy’, or that ‘you look fine, stop telling yourself there’s something wrong’. These people don’t understand that an ABI survivor’s best bet to recovery is putting their best foot forward, regardless of how they’re really feeling.

Ironically though, if you do try to live a normal life, these people will tell you that you are fine and they don’t believe that something is wrong. But when you are in such a bad state that you can’t get of the house, these same people will tell you to suck it up and stop being a baby. So, since I acquired my TBI, I appreciate those who have accepted the new reality as much as possible – the ones who have been patient.

Even something as little as needing space or not being upset if I need help reading, or if I just have the energy to stay home and watch TV are a big help to recovery. I also appreciate those who are not understanding, because it gives a more clear understanding of who you can trust or who is actually listening.

Saba acquired her brain injury in 2010, and is interested in TBI awareness and advocacy.

Advertisements