How to best return to work following a concussion in the computer driven 21st century

BY: COLIN HARDING

One in five Canadians will experience a concussion from sport in their lifetime. Suffering a concussion can lead to a range of debilitating symptoms such as constant fatigue, changes in mood, headaches and difficulty concentrating.

Returning to work after a concussion can be challenging and if not done properly may slow recovery. There are activities and techniques that allow for the smoothest transition back to normal life and the best chance for a full recovery.

The following are some tips on how to recover from a concussion and return back to work while maintaining your health.

There are good days and bad days and accepting that things will take time is important to maintaining a high level of mental health.

Say yes to help & support

The Centre of Disease Control and Prevention recommends gathering support as an important part of recovery and may help lift the burden of a concussion off an individual’s shoulders. Support can come from many places: a partner, a family member, a healthcare professional or a manager at work.

Having open channels of communication can lead to a greater understanding and empathy during recovery. It is easier for your peers to understand your situation and support you through the process if they know what has happened.

For example, a manager who knows their co-worker has recently experienced a concussion should lessen the workload initially as the individual begins the transition from rest back to work and this may help decrease their symptoms and stress.

Woman at her desk with head in her hands
PHOTO: enerpic.com

Avoid triggers

Once someone has experienced a concussion it is important to recognize what triggers his or her symptoms. Every concussion is different and these triggers may range from person to person. The backlight on a computer screen may cause headaches, exercise may cause nausea, and conversations may cause fatigue.

Every individual has a different set of factors that will influence their symptoms. If an activity makes symptoms worse, then it is important to stop that activity and rest. For instance, if conversations’ are overwhelming, take a break from social engagements.

Manage your energy

It may sound simple, but managing symptoms and energy amongst all of the different aspects in your life can be a real challenge. Once the symptoms are resolved someone may wish to return to work. Returning with a decreased workload, taking scheduled breaks and being cognisant and respecting symptoms are helpful to ensure that transition goes smoothly.

Accepting that an injury has happened, and that it will take some time to recover from, is another important aspect to consider when living with a concussion.

Be patient

There are good days and bad days and accepting that things will take time is important to maintaining a high level of mental health. The recovery process and managing setbacks can be incredibly frustrating, and patience can be one of the most important aspects of a recovery.

A person should focus on the activities that they can control and feel like they are making progress on, as opposed to the activities that are out of their control. Light exercise (As long as a person does not experience worsening symptoms), a balanced diet, and getting enough sleep are part of the foundation to achieve health and could be part of a recovery plan.

Having a concussion can initially be draining and frustrating. Having the support from work and peers, being aware, managing symptoms, and accepting that recovery takes time can go a long way towards making the transition back to normal life successful.

 


Colin Harding is the CEO and founder of Iris Technologiesa Canadian healthcare technology company that is improving the lives of peoplewho have suffered from a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or live with chronic migraines.

A version of this article originally appeared on the Iris Technologies Blog
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