The strength in her heart: Hero of Brain Injury Elizabeth Farquharson

BY: JENN BOWLER

Are you ready, heroes?  The BIST 5K is just days away!

Sign up or donate today: www.bist.ca/5k

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Meet Elizabeth Farquharson – the final hero we’re showcasing in our Heroes of Brain Injury Series – we can’t wait to see her and all the heroes on October 1st!

Our ABI hero Elizabeth Farquharson doesn’t need to run as fast of the speed of light to impress us, she’s worked in the field of brain injury for over two decades and is still going strong! Find out more about this amazing hero of brain injury below!

BY: JENN BOWLER 

 Elizabeth Farquharson
A true hero: Elizabeth Farquharson

 Tell us a bit about your work:

I have been a physiotherapist for 34 years and working in brain injury for about 20 of those years at Sunnybrook Hospital, as a clinician and more recently as a coordinator of care for trauma patients. I am a member of the ABI Network Transitions Committee and also have been involved in development of best practice guidelines for brain injury through the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation. Despite the often devastating nature of trauma and brain injury, it has been a very rewarding career and I am often in awe of the patients and families that I have worked with. I admire the way people have managed to conquer so many obstacles and continue along chosen paths or find new meanings and different ways of doing things.

Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

The BIST 5K is a way to support our brain injured patients and families and for our trauma ward to come together in a social event that is fun and inclusive. This year will be my fifth year participating!

I have run one year and walked all the other times – hoping one day there will be a prize for the slowest! I love that the BIST 5K doesn’t care how you do it; only that you do it. There are people cheering you over the finish line regardless of how fast or slow you are!

What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

It means doing your best to provide the best patient care that you can. It means supporting and advocating for your patients and families and being involved in that journey of recovery. Even if I’m only involved for a short time while they are part of the early acute care phase at Sunnybrook, it is still a privilege and honour to work with brain injured clients and families and see their progress and resilience. It is so rewarding when these individuals come back to visit us at the hospital, and we are able to follow their journeys.

What is your favourite part about Race Day?

It’s a lot of fun and I love meeting different people from survivors of brain injury to the whole spectrum of care involved in recovery. I love the park, the fresh air, the healthy competition and the family involvement!


Jenn Bowler is a social worker in the Trauma Program at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and is a member of the BIST 5K Run, Walk, & Roll Committee.

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Up, up and away! Meet Ellie Lapowich #BISTRUN’s heroic TOP fundraiser

What can’t we say about Ellie Lapowich? Not only does she sit on our Mix and Mingle Committee and is a proud BIST supporter – but Ellie also manages to be one of our (if not the top) fundraiser at our 5K each and every year.  We challenge you to take her on and see if you can beat her fundraising amounts this year! 

 
That’s just one reason why Ellie is an ABI Hero – read more about her below!
 
5K Poster 2017
Be an ABI Hero! Register today! www.bist.ca/5k
BY: JENN BOWLER

Tell us a bit about your work:

I have had the privilege of working with people who have sustained brain injuries for almost twenty years now. Since 2004, I have owned and operated Innovative Case Management Inc. (ICM), which is a community-based company that provides case management and occupational therapy services, as well as Catastrophic and medical legal assessments.

Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

I have participated in the BIST Run for the past several years because it is a great event that raises much needed funds for the wonderful programs offered by BIST. It is amazing to see such a great turnout year after year as members of our community, along with their families and friends (and often pets), cover the 5k while enjoying the camaraderie this event promotes.

BIST 5k top fundraiser Ellie Lapowich
ABI Super Fundraiser Ellie Lapowich

What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

I think the real heroes of brain injury are our clients who have sustained these injuries and work incredibly hard every day to overcome the many obstacles they now have to face. I have had the good fortune of meeting some amazing people who are true inspirations. I believe that our clients’ loved ones and caregivers are also heroes.

What is your favourite part about Race Day?

My favourite part of race day is watching brain injury survivours triumphantly cross the finish line.


Jenn Bowler is a social worker in the Trauma Program at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and is a member of the BIST 5K Run, Walk, & Roll Committee.

BIST Heroes 5K Dynamic Duo: Charles Gluckstein and his Sidekick Duke

Are you ready, heroes? Meet Charles Gluckstein – he says it’s his sidekick Duke who brings him out to the BIST Heroes 5K Run, Walk or Roll every year – but we’re pretty sure nothing on Earth could keep this ABI hero away from our 5K!

5K Poster 2017
Register today! www.bist.ca/5k

BY: JENN BOWLER

Tell us a bit about your work:

It is always heart wrenching, yet inspiring, to meet and work with individuals who have survived trauma including brain injuries. Most have a great will to persevere no matter the barrier. As a youngster my father exposed me to the places such as Variety Village and the Active Living Alliance where I could volunteer as a photographer for their special events and was amazed at the accomplishments and great spirit of individuals who had suffered from physical and mental challenges.

Once becoming a lawyer I immediately volunteered as a Director of the former BIST. Our firm [Gluckstein Personal Injury Lawyers] has always supported the Ontario Brain Injury Association of which my father was a founding director and similar organizations. I’m very passionate about helping individuals living with brain injuries as they are the most vulnerable victims, and the ones who need the most help with their recovery and changes in their lifestyle.

Charles Gluckstein swims in a lake with his dog Duke
True ABI Heroes: Charles Glucksten and Duke

Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

It’s Duke (my dog) who forces me to run the BIST 5K! He loves outdoor activities and being around people so he brings me along to drive him to the event. But in all seriousness, I participate in the BIST 5K event with my family because I believe it supports a great cause and one that is and has been close to our hearts.

What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

To me, a hero of brain injury is someone who has sustained an injury and is working hard every day to overcome the challenges they face, and tries every day to be better than they were the day before. I try to help those with brain injuries to receive financial, moral and medical support, but I am by no means the hero, they are.

What is your favorite part about race day?

My favorite part of race day is seeing everyone come together on an equal footing. You have brain injury survivors, community leaders and medical and legal professionals bringing their families to participate together towards the same goal. Once the suit and ties are off and the medical gowns are put away, the egos are put away as well. We are all there to have a good time and interact with one another, not as professionals, patients, referral sources, caregivers but instead as humans.


Jenn Bowler is a social worker in the Trauma Program at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and is a member of the BIST 5K Run, Walk, & Roll Committee.

Meet the fastest ABI heroes in the park: Garvin Moses & Kathleen Lawrence

BY: JENN BOWLER

As we gear up for BIST’s Heroes 5K Run, Walk or Roll on October 1st, we’re launching our 2nd Annual Heroes of Brain Injury Series, highlighting some ordinary folk with extraordinary ABI superpowers who come out to our 5K each year.

Read about our fastest heroes on Race Day – Garvin Moses and Kathleen Lawrence – below. But just so we’re clear, we know everyone who comes out to our 5K is a hero – no matter how fast they run, walk or roll!

Fastest BIST Run runners Garvin Moses and Kathleen Lawrence
 

REGISTER TODAY! WWW.BIST.CA/5K

 

 

Fastest Female: Kathleen Lawrence

RUN TIME: 21 min 33 sec

  1. Tell us a bit about your work:

    I work as an Occupational Therapist (OT) with Function Ability Rehabilitation Services, as an OT for approximately seven years now and with my role at Function Ability for over two years. With Function Ability, I work with people who have sustained a variety of traumatic injuries including brain injury; most of the clients I work with have been involved in motor vehicle collisions. I work with my clients to help support their recovery process and enable them to return to their activities of normal life and re-engage in their meaningful occupations. I love what I do and it has been a very fulfilling career thus far.

Kathleen Lawrence holds up her race number after a race
BIST Heroes 5K Run, Walk & Roll Fastest Female –  Kathleen Lawrence
  1. Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

I participate in the BIST 5K because I love running and because of my work with people living with brain injury. This race is helping further community participation, raise money and increase brain injury awareness. To me, running is all about setting my own personal goals and working to achieve them, the BIST 5K allows opportunity to meet my own goals.

I started running in 2011 as I had always enjoyed doing physical activity and I found it to be an easy activity to integrate into my weekly schedule and to be a great form of stress management and effective to support my own work / life balance. In order to help motivate myself to commit to running, I registered and ran my first half-marathon in the fall of 2011. I definitely experienced a ‘runner’s high’ after that race and since then, I’ve completed many half marathons and races from 5 to 30 km. I ran my first marathon in 2015 and have since completed four full marathons including qualifying for and running the Boston Marathon this past spring! I enjoy running many races over each year but I always look forward to running the BIST 5K – this will be my third year participating in the event.

  1. What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

To me, heroes are people who overcome obstacles and challenges to achieve something great. I think the true heroes of brain injury are the survivors, they are the ones working hard to overcome brain injury barriers to engage in their daily activities. In my role as an OT, I try to listen to my client’s concerns and challenges while reflecting and utilizing their strengths to help them progress towards their goals. Being a hero of brain injury could be providing support, having a positive attitude, engaging in reflective listening or simply just being there at the right time. There are brain injury heroes all around us, survivors, friends, family, caregivers, health care and legal professionals, and other rehabilitation team members. We all work together to fight brain injury.

  1. What is your favourite part about race day?

I enjoy the whole atmosphere of the race. The BIST 5km always has a special atmosphere about it where people come together to achieve a common goal, not only about participating in the event but creating brain injury awareness. I like the social atmosphere of the race and being able to spend time with other people to learn about their personal victories related to the event. There are always so many great success stories that occur at the BIST 5K; from just being able to attend the race, to running a first 5 km, to setting a personal best time – it is all about celebrating personal accomplishment. I also enjoy the feeling of crossing the finish line!

Fastest Male: Garvin Moses

RUN TIME: 19 min 40 sec

Fastest male runner at the BIST 5k Run, Walk or Roll every year - Garvin Moses
Faster than a speeding bullet: Garvin has won fastest male at our 5K since we began doing this race in 2011!
  1. Tell us a bit about your work:

The Neurologic Rehabilitation Institute of Ontario (NRIO) was my introduction to ABI and this field. I applied here shortly after graduating from the University of Windsor. I started off working as a rehabilitation therapist and slowly worked my way through the organization. I have been with NRIO for almost nine years and I currently manage two of their residential programs in Mississauga and south Etobicoke. Although at times it can be difficult managing two programs I have a great team of staff and therapists around me. I also really love the diversity of the two sites. The Mississauga program deals with more slow to recovery and non-ambulatory individuals, the south Etobicoke residence known as the SLA (supported living apartments) deals with higher functioning individuals and allows them to engage in rehabilitation in a much more independent environment. Working at the two different sites gives me an opportunity to work with two very different sub-groups of individuals as well as work with them in different points of their recovery.

  1. Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

Put quite simply, I run the BIST 5K every year because I enjoy it. I have participated in the BIST run since it first started in 2011* and really enjoy the crowd that it attracts. I remember a few years where it was pouring rain and passing people on the road wearing ponchos and a huge smile on their face. I think BIST is about community and bringing people together and this is definitely an opportunity to do just that

  1. What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

I would never really categorize myself as a hero. As I mentioned earlier, I’m only able to do what I do because of the great people I work with. More times than not, I’m telling my clients that they are the ones who motivate me whether it’s being able to say a family member’s name for the first time, ambulating stairs, or finishing high school when they thought they would never be able to. In some cases, it could be finishing that 5K race they have been training for all year long.

  1. What is your favourite part about Race Day?

I really do like the sense of community that is involved in this race. It allows survivors and service providers to come together in a non-threatening environment. From a selfish perspective, I also enjoy hanging out by the finish line to see the smiles and looks of fulfillment as people cross the finish line.


Jenn Bowler is a social worker in the Trauma Program at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and is a member of the BIST 5K Run, Walk, & Roll Committee.
 

Mighty Mike

The heroes of brain injury are assembling for the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll on October 1st!

As we prepare for Race Day, BIST has selected a special superhero squad of amazing heroes of brain injury we will feature on a weekly basis until the big day.

Meet Mighty Mike – #7 in our Heroes of Brain Injury Series.

DONATE TO THE HEROES OF BRAIN INJURY HERE

Be sure to collect all seven heroes!

A father of two, Mike lives in a long term care facility outside of Toronto. Every year, he raises money for a wheelchair accessible taxi so he can get to the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll, and walk over the finish line.

Because of where he lives, Mike can’t get to BIST’s programs and services, but he says he looks forward to Race Day as a highlight of his year. Find out why staff and residents at Mike’s long term care facility call him an inspiration. 

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Can you talk about how you acquired your brain injury?

I was driving home from work at 2:30 in the morning and I blacked out and hit a tree head on. I drove into a shallow ditch. According to the doctor, I hit the windshield which caused a brain bleed.

The right side of the brain was damaged. That’s what they told me what happened.

I was put into a coma for several months. After they showed me the CT scan of my brain and it was submerged in blood.

Prior to the accident, I didn’t know [I had an aneurysm]. The aneurysm moved to the part of the brain responsible for eye sight, which caused me to black out. That was 10 years ago this October 15th.

I still have the aneurysm, and I have a shunt in my brain.

support-big-mike

Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

My therapist Phil told me about the race. He asked me if I would go with him, get fresh air and do the run, he told me all about BIST.

I do it for my cause and possibly to inspire people to achieve [their own] goals.

I look forward to the Run. I walk over the finish line with no assistance or with very little assistance. I can’t walk or run [yet] but I’m getting closer and closer ever day. I walk every day [in therapy].

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Mike walking across the finish line in 2015.

What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

I’m a survivor of a traumatic brain injury which affected my personal life as well as work life. I’ve had intense therapy to achieve the goals I’ve achieved so far. I still have goals and would like to inspire others to set goals and achieve them.

[My goal] is to be able to walk home and be home with my wife and kids like a father and a husband should be.

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A card from Mike’s son displayed in his room.

I think it would be a better life experience than sitting here all the time. But I understand the injury and the situation.

My wife is my anchor. She’s my soul mate and my best friend.

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Join the Heroes of Brain Injury Squad – sign up for the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll TODAY!

Fast Frank

The heroes of brain injury are assembling for the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll on October 1st!

As we prepare for Race Day, BIST has selected a special superhero squad of amazing heroes of brain injury we will feature on a weekly basis until the big day.

Meet Fast Frank – #6 in our Heroes of Brain Injury Series.

Be sure to collect all seven heroes!

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Can you talk about how you acquired your brain injury?

I was at work and I fell 20 feet. I have no memory of it, my subconscious won’t allow me [to remember]. I spent three weeks in a coma. I was a four on the Glasgow Coma Scale. A score of four means you’ve got a foot and a half in the grave. Part of my injury is that I never understood the extent of my injury.

How long have you been involved with BIST?

 I did HIAT/BIAT first [BIST’s predecessor].

Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

We need money. We don’t get government support.

What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

I guess it means that we keep plugging away every single day, so we get better. Mistakes are proof that you’re trying. There’s nothing wrong with failure, it’s a teaching tool.

It’s the most difficult thing to learn how to do everything all over again.

What are you looking forward to on Race Day?

It’s everyone helping everyone else. It’s the whole brain injury community coming together.

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Fast Frank is totally a BIST hero!

You can find out more about Frank’s story HERE and read about his experience running the Pan Am Relay HERE.

Join the Heroes of Brain Injury Squad – sign up for the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll TODAY!

 

 

 

 

Charismatic Colleen

The heroes of brain injury are assembling for the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll on October 1st!

As we prepare for Race Day, BIST has selected a special superhero squad of amazing heroes of brain injury.

Meet Charismatic Colleen – #5 in our Heroes of Brain Injury Series.

Be sure to collect all seven heroes!

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How long have you been working in brain injury?

I started in health care 27 years ago and I have been working with people who have sustained a brain injury for the past 21 years. I have been working for NRIO (Neurologic Rehabilitation Institute of Ontario) for over 20 years and it has been a long and fulfilling career.

Describe your work with NRIO

I am a teacher by profession and I also have a marketing background. I returned to school 4 years ago and completed the Case Management certification through McMaster and the Life Care Planning certification through the University of Florida. I joined [NRIO] to do marketing and helped promote NRIO over the years and giving back to the community. For the past 16 years I have been the Executive Director, and took on more of a management role, but marketing is my first love, education, meeting clients, their families and the referral sources. I am the first person called and thereafter I delegate to my competent and professional managers and staff.  I have an invested interest in all of our clients, their happiness/success and proud to say I know something about every client.

Effective September 1st, NRIO was acquired by Bayshore Therapy & Rehab and I am thrilled about this acquisition and the continuum of care NRIO and Bayshore Therapy & Rehab can provide. My title has changed to Director, NRIO.

What has been your role at BIST?

I was the founding chair of BIST in 2004, and BIST holds a very very special place in my heart.

I feel I am more valuable sitting on sub-committees and contributing to projects and seeing the end results. I hold the Board members, staff and volunteers in the highest regard and their energy, time and commitment is invaluable.  I have been on the awareness committee since 2000, was on the communications committee and continue supporting the volunteer committee.

My most recent project was helping BIST find a new Executive Director.

Why do you participate in the BIST 5K?

I’ve been doing the run since it began in 2011. I feel very committed to BIST and the work that the board and the staff do and the invaluable contributions from the members. I will do what I can to support BIST, its success and our ongoing commitment to the members and the brain injury community.

BIST’s mantra from the beginning is doing it well, whether it is a small or big task. We have not taken on large goals that we can’t accomplish. I am extremely proud of BIST’s accomplishments and achievements to date.

What does being a hero of brain injury mean to you?

To me being a hero of brain injury demonstrates that I’ve been selected because of the people I serve. I am not the hero. The main heroes are the clients  who have sustained the brain injury, the ones who work so hard every day to get to where they are and demonstrate those super powers to be able to get their lives back, and to provide sustainable outcomes and recoveries. They are the true heroes and all of us involved in their lives are the conduits to help our clients reach their ultimate goals.

What is your favourite part about Race Day?

I love everything that [the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll] brings together – the clients, their families, friends and professionals – we are all one at the end of the day with the same goals – participate, have fun, make money for BIST and give back to the community.

Everybody is equal at these events, tries their best and no matter what it is they accomplish, or what they do and no matter what milestone, whether they’re wheeling a kilometre, or if they’re walking for 500 metres, or if they’re running one kilometre, doing the 5K everybody is equal and doing the best that they possibly can.

Charismatic Colleen has been a big part of BIST over the years! Read the tips she gave on training for the 5K, along with her NRIO team member Garvin, HERE and how she won BIST’s Volunteer of the Year Award in 2013, HERE.

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Join the Heroes of Brain Injury Squad – sign up for the BIST 5K Run, Walk and Roll TODAY!