TTC subway line numbers: what do you think?

At our October community meeting, BIST member Shireen Jeejeebhoy spoke to us about her concerns with the change of TTC subway line names to numbers.

picture of TTC subway signs
PHOTO VIA SHIREEN JEEJEEBHOY 

To summarize, Shireen thinks the subway line renaming, and TTC signage create cognitive and navigational challenges for people living with brain injury, and possibly people living with other kinds of disabilities as well.

Shireen also spoke about her experience at the TTC Public Forum on Accessible Transit this September, which she attended with BIST board member Kerry Foschia.

You can read more about  Shireen’s thoughts on the subway line name changes, and her recap of the TTC meeting on her blog, jeejeebhoy.ca.

Many members shared Shireen’s concerns about this issue, and expressed interest in contacting the TTC about their thoughts on TTC subway number lines and other accessibility issues.

Shireen has provided the following contact information for anyone to wants to share their concerns about the TTC:

TTC officials

Ian Dickson, Manager, Design and Wayfinding  https://twitter.com/ttcdesign or Ian.dickson@ttc.ca

Brad Ross, Head of Communications  https://twitter.com/bradttc or brad.ross@ttc.ca

PHOTO VIA SHIREEN JEEJEEBHOY
PHOTO VIA SHIREEN JEEJEEBHOY

TTC contact info for complaints, suggestions or compliments

For help with questions and concerns 7am-10pm 7 days/week: 416-393-3030; https://twitter.com/TTChelps

The TTC’s online form for complaints, suggestions or compliments

For service updates – When a service update gets tweeted, Shireen re-tweets it with the original line name and adds #accessibility in the post https://twitter.com/TTCnotices

For more information, you can contact Shireen via her Twitter or through her blog.

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August community meeting: positive affirmations

At our August community meeting, BIST programs and services coordinator Kat Powell taught us about positive affirmations. After her talk, we made affirmation baskets – creating beautiful places to put our positive affirmations in and read when we need to.

a sample of affirmation baskets

Positive affirmations stem from a psychological theory which became popular in the late 1980s, coined by Claude SteeleAffirmations can be negative or positive, and it’s important to work on positive self-affirmations as a way to help ourselves and believe in ourselves. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, self-affirmation is:

The recognition and assertion of the existence and value of one’s individual self.

Negative affirmations, such as thinking ‘I’m no good at this’, are easy. How many times a day do you find yourself thinking negative thoughts, or self-critiquing? Negative affirmations erode at our self-esteem and happiness over time.

We generate many affirmations throughout the day, and when we doubt ourselves, the negative affirmations can cancel out whatever positive affirmations we have. This is why it’s important to develop your positive self-talk, think of it like building muscle,  so that you’re strong enough emotionally for when you need it the most.

Two BIST members work on affirmation baskets

To make our baskets, Kat brought some samples of positive affirmations she had found online. BIST members chose which ones suited them, and then decorated plastic baskets to hold their affirmations.

Most people used bright coloured tissue paper to decorate.

BIST member holds up finished affirmation basket

You can find many examples of positive affirmations online, including these two sites for  people living with brain injury and their families / caregivers:

3 tips for writing affirmations

There are also many examples of creating affirmation jars online – they range from the super-simple, to the very complex – for the more artistically inclined:

BIST member works on Affirmation basket

NEXT COMMUNITY MEETING: SEPTEMBER 28th, 6-8 p.m.
TOPIC: POSITIVE PSYCHOLOLOGY
MORE INFO